Below is a collection of Dr. McGlaughlin's most recent observations (500+). Most of these observations are made throughout the course of everyday life, captured by dictation, and added to FlintsNotes.com. You can read more about the observation capture process here. The content here changes 5 days a week, so be sure to check back often. Also, feel free to leave a comment in the comments section of each observation.

On Avoiding the Semantic Tug-of-War between Truth and Word Choice

When crafting theoretical statements, you need to know the difference between an elegant choice of words (that is something you select) and a properly accurate…

On the Danger of Attempting to Answer a Futile Question

You need to recognize when your mental gears are "grinding" and you need to stop and ask why. Most of the time just "pushing through" yields an unsatisfactory…

On the Difference between a Leader and a Winner

Many large companies are run by men who can be more aptly described as winners than leaders. They have obtained the position by winning over their peers. They…

On Choosing as Existing

The hallmark of the rational agent is choice. How can reason be separate from choice? Even the acceptance of a proposition represents choice. We need to delve…

On Relaxing into Who You Are

As I grow older, I grow wary of adopting life-shaped stereotypes. Our culture has a series of forms and we try to fit people into those forms. It's a kind of…

On Speaking and Allowing the Audience to Optimize You

Artful speaking is a combination of careful planning and purposeful abandonment. The speaker plans, makes notes and outlines their remarks. When it comes time to…

On the Danger of Confusing a Reason With a Belief

We must beware of conflating our reasons with our beliefs. When asked to support a position, we often offer a reason. However, what we view as a reason is likely…

On the Danger of Reducing the Decision Process to the Rational

We must be careful about trying to reduce the decision processes to the rational. A person may use a reasoned framework, while employing reasons that are…

On Humility and the Unevenness of Virtue

Humility, for most of us, comes in pieces. We don’t fully achieve it, but we illustrate it in glimpses. If we’re not careful, we confuse the parts with the…

On Family as a Patchwork Quilt

A family is not a fine silk tapestry. It is more like a patchwork quilt: scraps of material, bits of cloth, “this-and-that” — all stitched together. At first, it…

On How Structure Can Impose Confusion

As I seek to try and build a beautiful organization, I realize that structure is closely associated with one's concept of beauty. Structure is foundational to…

On the Immortality Bestowed by the Written Word

Socrates would have gone unknown were it not for the work of Plato. Seneca might have been a footnote in history had it not been for his work. The same could be…

On Empathy as the Essence of Communication

Empathy is at the essence of communication. The gifted communicator is not talking to an audience; he is listening from the audience. He hears himself with the…

On the Artificial Distinction Between Work Life and Personal Life

Work performance is a composite of the employee’s entire life. Never view their work life and their personal life as totally separate. These categories are mere…

On the Implied Commitment Accompanying “I Love You”

Young people and some adults (age is not the determinant factor) are often confused on the subject of love. The words "I love you" spoken between a couple are…