Below is a collection of Dr. McGlaughlin's most recent observations (500+). Most of these observations are made throughout the course of everyday life, captured by dictation, and added to FlintsNotes.com. You can read more about the observation capture process here. The content here changes 5 days a week, so be sure to check back often. Also, feel free to leave a comment in the comments section of each observation.

On the Value of Contingent Decisions

Leaders need to understand the value of a contingent decision. This is a decision based upon assumptions/warrants that can be later validated. The contingent…

On Craftsmanship as Directional, Not Definitive

I love to see symmetry in the presentation of words and terms. However, I am painfully aware of the fact that the symmetry is never truly symmetrical, that the…

On Art and the Priority of Relentless Thinking over Generous Criticism

Likeness indicates essence. Art is an extreme universe populated by rare achievements of genius nearly smothered by bland, mundane, “me-too” frauds. You cannot…

On the Importance of the Connection between The Mission, The Work, and The Person

It is important for every person who works for you to know that they are important. If you treat them like they are important, they will treat their work like it…

On the Practice of Marketing as Science and Art

Stephen Brown, from the University of Ulster, in 2001, wrote a paper now considered a classic: Art or Science? 50 years of marketing debate.[1] Brown is an…

On the Importance of the Decision Process over the Decision Outcome

Our purpose minded programming predisposes us to focus on outcome instead of process. This is particularly true of the decision cycle. Decision-makers need…

On Leadership and the Need to See through Three Sets of Eyes

The leader must develop a rare ability to see through three sets of eyes. He must see himself, his team, and his customers through his own eyes, but he must be…

On Marketing and the Power of Specificity

Specificity converts. In marketing there should be no such thing as a general message. The marketer communicates with an aim. This aim should dictate everything…

On the Perspective of Art and it’s Many Shapes

All of art is a form of poetry. Art cannot be judged by the criterion of the efficient, nor is it’s inherit inefficiency a form of subtle glorification. Art is…

On Speaking with the Background

Often, I occupy the foreground of my mind in order to ruminate with the "background." I have little confidence in the accepted classification of conscious and…

On Leadership and The Need to Separate the “What” from the “When”

The leader knows “where” before he knows “how,” but he knows “how” before he knows “when.” It is the “when” element which makes fools out of wise men. We often…

On the Three-Question Path that Defines My Becoming

The question, “Why do people say yes?” is different than the question, “Why does a (particular) person say yes?” While the two questions seem similar, the…

On Frustration as a Corrective

Frustration is seen as a negative, but frustration, like pain, serves as an important corrective. When we experience pain, we alter our actions (if we touch the…

On Leadership and the Need to Harness Fear

A good leader will create some fear. Popular literature has made us afraid of fear. But a team that does not experience some fear is not dealing with…

On Intensification as Variance in Literature

How can one bring more craftsmanship to short reflective passages? One of the key moves within quality literature is to introduce disharmony into a seemingly…