B2B Summit ‘Value Proposition’ Excerpts—Dr. Flint McGlaughlin


Take a look inside the B2B Summit (http://bit.ly/nPbjUv). This clip is from the Boston B2B Summit 2011.

 

Comments

Vincent F Sandford on Sep 8, 2015

You can apply the concepts of the value proposition to various situations.  For example:  messages in a political election.
The Labour Party’s Value Proposition days before the UK General Election of May 2015.
“A Better Plan
A Better Future
1. A strong economic foundation.
2. Higher living standards for working families.
3. An NHS (National Health Service) with the time to care.
4. Controls on immigration.
5. A Country where the next generation can do better than the last.
6. Homes to buy and action on rents.”
These pledges, unveiled by Ed Miliband Leader of the Labour Party days before the UK General Election, attempted to focus the minds of the electorate on the important issues of this 2015 election.  Ed Miliband, attempting to win the election and become the UK’s Prime Minister, said these pledges were the corner stone of his policies.  He failed to win.  The stone, measuring almost two metres in height, become a source of ridicule. Why?
We may attempt to analyse these pledges using the value proposition heuristic.  First I guess Ed Miliband was trying to answer the question:  If I am your ideal political party why should I vote for you rather than your competitors?  Because I make these six pledges.  I guess the reason why these pledges did not resonate with the UK electoral is because:
a. Lacked specificity
b. Lacked credulity although message clarity was evident
c. Lacked mental belief
d. Lacked exclusivity but these was appeal in the message – obviously not enough.
e. The cost side of the heuristic was too heavy.
Given the pledges as a value proposition, is the above analyse correct?  Please comment.

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