Latest Observations

On Personal Peace as a Function of Our Choosing

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:Aug 3, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Flint M

Personal peace is a result of our (present tense act of) choosing; it is the result of how we allow ourselves to interpret (see) the phenomena that effects our person. The way we choose to see (focus upon) a phenomena stimulates the nature of our reaction (and thus our condition). One should not work for peace; one should work from peace.

On Leadership and the Difference Between Hard Work and Intense Obsession

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:Jul 30, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Flint M

The leader should understand the difference between hard work and intense obsession. You are not a hard worker if you are only good at working hard on tasks with which you are obsessed. Obsessive people work hard for the sake of their interest. Hard workers work hard for the sake of their integrity. The best leaders harness their obsessions, but work from their integrity; the combination is potent.

On the Leader’s Solemn Obligation to Panic

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:Jul 29, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Austin M

The leader has a solemn obligation to "panic" before the rest of the team. Panic, in its most accurate sense, does not reflect my meaning. I'm using intense language to try to express an important point. The leader must see the impending threat and respond early. He must treat it with urgency, extreme urgency - even before his team is fully aware of the problem.

On the Difference Between Observation and Inference

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:Jul 28, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

The classical understanding of the difference between observation and inference is difficult to maintain. One may be able to make some type of general distinction by using loose, emphasis-based categorization.

The difference between observation and inference becomes difficult to detect because the process is not linear; it is cyclic. The process of observing involves some form of inference. If the mind moves, the mind infers.

On Avoiding the Semantic Tug-of-War between Truth and Word Choice

Topic:Communication
Posted on:Jul 27, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

When crafting theoretical statements, you need to know the difference between an elegant choice of words (that is something you select) and a properly accurate (and hopefully true) statement (that is something you discover). If you do not know the difference you will get caught in a semantic veil. The beauty of your words will obscure the accuracy of your claims. Honesty is beauty of a higher order.

On the Danger of Attempting to Answer a Futile Question

Topic:Personal
Posted on:Jul 24, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Austin M

You need to recognize when your mental gears are "grinding" and you need to stop and ask why. Most of the time just "pushing through" yields an unsatisfactory result. It is essential to understand why those gears are grinding. You may be asking the wrong question or you may be trying to attempt a solution that can't be discovered yet. Many thinkers have damaged their long-term capacity, in their futile attempt to answer a futile question. Thinking, even difficult thinking, should be fluid - beware of "the grind."

On the Difference between a Leader and a Winner

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:Jul 23, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:David J

Many large companies are run by men who can be more aptly described as winners than leaders. They have obtained the position by winning over their peers. They have built their career on a series of successive wins. These wins have translated into the culminating victory of their focused assignment.

However, there is a significant difference between a winner and a leader. A winner is more concerned with achieving the next personal gain. A leader is focused on the authentic wins of his team. He is empowering their victories. Their gain is the organization's gain and the organization's gain is his gain.

The true leader must transcend winning with serving. He must change his focus from goals to mission.

On Choosing as Existing

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:Jul 22, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Paul C

The hallmark of the rational agent is choice. How can reason be separate from choice? Even the acceptance of a proposition represents choice. We need to delve deeper into the nature of choice. Indeed, for the rational agent, choosing is existing. The present tense is a steady stream of choice.

On Relaxing into Who You Are

Topic:Personal
Posted on:Jul 21, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Austin M

As I grow older, I grow wary of adopting life-shaped stereotypes. Our culture has a series of forms and we try to fit people into those forms. It's a kind of mental shorthand. It allows us to distinguish Person A from Person B; it allows us to predict behavior.

The problem is that these stereotypical forms are restrictive. As I try to fit into any of them, my edges break off. I don't mean my rough edges, but rather the sharp edges of my soul. It can be very wearisome fitting oneself into someone's ideal of a "scholar," or of an "entrepreneur," or of some spiritual archetype. There is a kind of integral honesty that comes from relaxing into who you are; that is the first step on the path to becoming who you were made to be.

On Speaking and Allowing the Audience to Optimize You

Topic:Communication
Posted on:Jul 20, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

Artful speaking is a combination of careful planning and purposeful abandonment. The speaker plans, makes notes and outlines their remarks. When it comes time to step onto the platform, the speaker subjects all of this preparation to the imminent priority of the audience’s response. This requires a different type of preparation — preparing one’s self. One must be prepared to surrender their mechanical plan to the realities of the action. You do not optimize a presentation so much as you allow the audience to optimize you.