Latest Observations

On Marketing Translating Science to Art

Topic:Communication
Posted on:May 27, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

The discoveries of science can never fully bridge the mystery of the human mind. We need art to discern the difference. The effective marketer converts experiments and metrics into elegant forms of communication. For the marketing organization to be truly successful, it must respect both the science and the art. Indeed, marketing translates science into art.

On the Essence of Wisdom

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:May 26, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Flint M

At the essence of wisdom is pattern recognition, this phenomena occurs across a sequence. Wisdom is costly; it is typically achieved through experience, the ecosystem of pattern recognition. Experience is closely connected to the passing of time and thus it consumes our most limited resource. The best way to extend this (seemingly un-extendable resource) is through pattern recognition. It allows us to live from one experience extending into another before it actually happens.

On Discovering What You Want the Most

Topic:Personal
Posted on:May 25, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

Discover what you want the most. It is the only way you will have the power to achieve internal alignment. We live the first part of our lives kidding ourselves about what we want the most. We say what we want the most, but it is not the truth.

For instance, we say that most of all we want to build a beautiful family, but that is not true. Indeed, it is not until our kids are almost gone that we realize what we wanted most was to achieve an image of success. And so we live a life of contradiction.

The lies we tell ourselves are more potent than the lies we tell others. And one of the greatest self-deceptions is the lie we tell ourselves about what we really want the most. Living your whole life in a web of inter-linked activities that serve what you think you want the most, but not what you really want the most is a life doomed to dissatisfaction.

On Moving Away So One Can Move Towards

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:May 24, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

Some leaders move away from threats while others move towards opportunities. There is a time for both actions, but at certain levels in the organization, the leader may achieve success by concentrating on the former. This can be problematic - for often this person, by virtue of their success, is elevated to the top position.

At the top, the leader will only achieve success by concentrating on the latter - they must move towards opportunities. Indeed, moving away from the wrong place does not get you necessarily into the right place. Moving "away" is valuable in so much as it enables you to move "towards."

On Story as Pharmacia

Topic:Communication
Posted on:May 23, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Flint M

The mind responds to the construct of story. Certain authors, especially in Europe, and now in much of contemporary America, reject the beginning, middle, and end approach to story. They rightfully perceive that many stories do not have immediate resolve. They advocate a "slice of life" approach to writing. But I think we err when we conceive of story as an external sequence.

Story is a drug - It bypasses our critical sensors and alters our consciousness. If one is to write an effective story, one must match their representation of reality to the realities of the person experiencing that representation. This requires one to consider the impact of the combined ingredients on the mental/physical components of the recipient.

The artful author is not just writing a story; he is mixing a drug.

On the Quest for Wholeness

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:May 20, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

I think the internal quest to be fully human is a quest for wholeness. Our divided selves reflect our distance from the ideal. As we pursue full integration; an undivided heart, we are in fact moving towards the actualization of our person. This pursuit inevitably integrates all of the pathos within an individual. Such an integration artfully encompasses symmetry.

On the Priority of Momentum over Scale

Topic:Personal
Posted on:May 19, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

Be more concerned with momentum than you are with scale. It is not the size that matters it is the velocity. 

On Communication and the Distinction between the Logical and Perceptual

Topic:Communication
Posted on:May 18, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Anthony W

There are two kinds of patterns in our conversation. The first is essentially logical. The second is essentially perceptual. It reminds me of the difference between English and Hebrew poetry. The former rhymes and contrast sounds. The latter rhymes and contrasts thoughts. The difference between Milton's Paradise Lost and the Sefer Tehillim is apparent, but the similarity is disguised by the different forms of patterns.

On Leadership and Looking the Dragon in the Eye

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:May 17, 2016
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Flint M

Leaders need to beware of reports that put a happy face on bad news. Bad news needs to be exactly what it is. Any interpretation that is unrealistic prevents the leader from seeing clearly enough to take the right action. We have to cut through the positive spin to find out precisely what has come up. One of the principle responsibilities of the leader is to look the dragon in the eye; closing your eyes doesn’t keep the dragon from devouring you.

On Leadership and Reading as Dialogue

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:May 16, 2016
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:David J

For most people, reading is a monologue. But, the leader must make reading a dialogue. As we read certain content (hopefully not just business content), we should be asking, “How does this impact me?” We should be looking at the meaning beneath the meaning, and this only occurs when we slow down enough to turn the typical monologue we call reading, into a dialogue we call self-examination.