Latest Observations

On the Simultaneous Experience of Joy and Agony

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:Jan 23, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:David J

I do not understand how joy and agony can co-exist within the same person, even within the same instant. Life is an inversion of paradoxes. One can be full of joy and, yet, full of agony. The human container is too frail. A soul cannot contain the whole truth. This is what separates me from the ultimate. I cannot bear what I know. I cannot bear the knowledge of what I do not know, either. However, amidst the overwhelming desperation, is a sense that the edge of beauty is only experienced at the edge of frailty. When all I experience is too much, I come to value the marvelous potential of life. Joy and agony can co-exist. Beauty is evidenced when they touch.

On Content That Does Not Fit within a Container

Topic:Communication
Posted on:Jan 22, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Austin M

When my mind is engaged in layers of introspection, the structure I embed my thoughts within can sometimes prove inadequate. This can catch me by surprise. I am focused on the content, not the container, but in the depths of the reflection, I discover that the content no longer fits within the container. I have to modify the latter to absorb the former. In such cases, I look for the most flexible container. This is how we developed the observation system. It provides maximum flexibility for capturing thoughts. It legitimizes chaos.

On the Difference between a Good Decision and the Right Decision

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:Jan 21, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

The leader does not lead with internal certainty; a leader leads from internal peace. Certainty and peace are not the same. I have often experienced peace with a decision, even though I am uncertain as to its outcome. The leader who strives for certainty will live a life of anxiety. There is a difference between a good decision and the right decision. The leader’s goal is to make a good decision. Indeed, the leader’s goal should be to embark on a pattern of good decisions. Often enough, this will lead to the right outcome.  

On Conflating the Two Concepts of Convergence Theory and Enterprise Locus

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:Jan 20, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:David J

I am conflating two concepts: convergence theory and enterprise locus.

Transformation assumes an external force working against an entity. In the event that force is being applied to an entity in a given dimension, the force must be channeled. In those cases where the energy itself is the only force, then the energy is all that is necessary. Nevertheless, if there is an item, such as a message being delivered, then you will have the content and the energy. The means of reaching the entity becomes the distribution. One might argue that this is not the means but, rather, the action of distributing the energy. Nevertheless, energy by its very nature distributes. It implies motion. Thus, one might be able to unify content distribution and energy as a single factor, depending on certain circumstances.

On Transcending Value with Satisfaction

Topic:Communication
Posted on:Jan 19, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Flint M

Commerce can be understood through the lens of the subject-predicate concept. The entity predicates. The essential predication can be described by two sets of activities: 1) They create satisfaction and 2) They offer satisfaction.

I use the word “create” to suggest any activity that results in a product. I use the word product to encompass any form of value offered via a hard good or a service. I use the word offer to describe the special activity of communicating the potential satisfaction or value.

The average CEO underestimates the import of this secondary type of predication. A business that does not offer will not remain a business. Indeed, a business that does not offer is not a business an intentional contradiction. This leads to two operative words: “offer” and “satisfaction.”

I could use the word “value” instead of the word “satisfaction,” but I am transcending value with a customer focus. Value that does not satisfy is meaningless. One may argue that it is not even value. It was value in the mind of the business, but it is not value in the mind of the customer. If it is not value in the mind of the customer, we do not have a customer. Thus, we do not have value. Therefore, we do not have a business.

On Thinking Fast vs. Thinking Deep

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:Jan 16, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

I need to let the passion for my organization’s value proposition to drive us forward, but I cannot let this same passion “break” us either... The leader must play the long game. We should work in multiples of five. While tasks should be achieved at the most fluid (which is the fastest) speed, values can only be instilled slowly. We should multiply our desired timeframe by five. For tasks, think fast. For values, think deep.

On Shifts in our Paradigm and Future Action Sets

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:Jan 15, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Austin M

At the foundation of our thinking is an essential philosophy, a self-paradigm (a view of ourselves as we relate to the world). When we process from this perspective it is difficult for us to imagine ever performing certain actions. Indeed, some actions seem completely “out of bounds." But if we experience a shift in our essential philosophy, our future action set can appear quite different. More importantly, our interpretation of our past actions can appear different. A shift at the foundation of your self-paradigm impacts your perspective – not just on the future, but on the past. It makes possible a future action set that would have previously been unthinkable.

On Leadership and the Danger of Lavish Praise

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:Jan 14, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Paul C

Lavish praise loses its luster (as does everything else in which we lavishly indulge). Dale Carnegie is often quoted for advising his readers to be “lavish in your praise,” but I think the leader should be careful about taking Carnegie too literally. One’s praise should be specific and honest. Carnegie’s admonition is best translated into a high level of alertness for each meaningful opportunity to praise, and thus encourage, our team members. 

On Leadership and the Danger of the “Promising” Opportunity

Topic:Leadership
Posted on:Jan 13, 2015
Method:Dictation
Captured by:Paul C

When presented a "promising" opportunity, eight out of 10 times I run for my life. The number one difference between a seemingly effective leader and a truly effective leader is the manner in which they spend their time. Both seem to be doing the same thing, but one is seizing "promising" opportunities that will never yield, while the other is refusing to waste a single moment.

On Considering the Extremities of the Human Condition

Topic:Philosophy
Posted on:Jan 12, 2015
Method:Previous Writings
Captured by:Paul C

The human condition must be considered along with its extremities. It has poles. On one hand, you have extreme ecstasy, and on the other, you have extreme agony. However, we work out most of our theology and philosophy within the confines of a small segment in the middle.

The people who experience life outside of that limited segment often find our theological and philosophical formulations insufficient. Indeed, they cannot even relate to us because we have no authentic frame of reference. Whatever life system we embrace should consider the entire spectrum of human experience.